We’re looking for submissions.

We’re looking to publish essays, articles, examples of sequences of┬álessons, and brief summaries of historical events which share our central focus: dismantling systems of oppression through history┬áteaching.

Submissions in any form or of any length, up to c. 2500 words, will be considered.

Authors need no background in history teaching.

Critiquing Christodoulou: why ‘Educational Equality’ in a Capitalist Society is like a reading room in a prison

Adam Robertson suggests that, while Daisy Christodoulou’s ideas about the cognitive power that pupils develop by learning knowledge hold great emancipatory potential for our pupils, her limited conception of ‘educational equality’ and uncritical acceptance of elite forms of knowledge threaten to undermine that potential and preserve the status quo.

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Daisy Christodoulou, in her ‘Seven Myths About Education’, presents a compelling case for teaching young people knowledge.

To do so may seem commonsense, but expressly avoiding knowledge, instead focusing on group work, skill development and minimising the amount of time teachers spend talking to students have been considered best practice by Ofsted, and have been a widely held consensus, for some time. Continue reading “Critiquing Christodoulou: why ‘Educational Equality’ in a Capitalist Society is like a reading room in a prison”